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Congenital heart defects may not increase the risk of severe COVID-19 symptoms
Adults and children born with heart defects had a lower-than-expected risk of developing moderate or severe COVID-19 symptoms, finds a study of more than 7,000 patients from the congenital heart disease center at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons.
What happens when babies with heart defects become adults?
More than 90 percent of babies born with heart defects survive into adulthood. As a result, there are now more adults living with congenital heart disease than children. These adults have a chronic, lifelong condition and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) has produced advice to give the best chance of a normal life. The guidelines were published online in European Heart Journal, and on the ESC website.
High BP during pregnancy tied to newborn heart defects
Babies born to moms with a pregnancy complication called pre-eclampsia may have a heightened risk of heart defects, a large new study finds.

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