News ID: 314919
Published: 0715 GMT July 18, 2021

Muslims worldwide prepare for Eid al-Adha festivities

Muslims worldwide prepare for Eid al-Adha festivities

Compiled from Dispatches

Muslim people across the world are preparing for Eid al-Adha, which marks the end of the hajj ceremony and the second most important religious festivity after Eid al-Fitr.

Muslims traditionally mark Eid al-Adha, the Feast of Sacrifice, by offering special prayers and slaughtering livestock, usually a goat, sheep, a cow or a camel, to commemorate Prophet Ibrahim’s test of faith.

The holiday, coinciding with the hajj, the annual Islamic pilgrimage to Mecca, begins on Tuesday, and Muslims traditionally mark the occasion by slaughtering sheep or cows and exchanging gifts.

During the feast of Eid al-Adha, Iranians re-enact Ibrahim's obedience by sacrificing a cow or ram. The family will eat about a third of the meal a third goes to friends and relatives, and the remaining third is donated to the poor and needy.

Muslim worshippers take part in countrywide prayers in Iran on the festive occasion of Eid al-Adha.

In Turkey, the holiday for the Eid al-Adha was planned to officially start on July 20 and end on July 23, hurriyetdailynews.com wrote.

But Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan announced on July 12 a decision, declaring that there would be a holiday on July 19, which is Monday, making it a nine-day public holiday, including the two weekends.

Turkish citizens are expected to flock to tourism destinations or hit the road as early as July 16 to visit their relatives during the long holiday, which most probably will cause long lines and traffic congestion on major roads.

Residents in the UAE will enjoy a six-day break on the occasion of Arafat Day and Eid al-Adha, starting on July 19, wrote khaleejtimes.com.

An official four-day holiday was announced from Monday, July 19 to Thursday, July 22. Combined with the weekend, the break involves a grand total of six days off.

Regular working hours will resume from Sunday, July 25.

Streets, bridges and roundabouts of Abu Dhabi have been decorated with thousands of lights for Eid al-Adha.

The Abu Dhabi City Municipality installed about 2,800 luminous formations and models in the city and suburbs. There were butterflies, ships, Arabic coffee pots and other elements highlighting the UAE customs. The best decorations can be found at the Corniche – a favourite destination among Abu Dhabi residents and visitors.

With all these Eid sparkles, the municipality hopes to spread cheer and positivity even as residents mark the festive season amid the pandemic.

According to Daily Sabah, for Palestinians who lost loved ones in Israeli airstrikes two months ago, there is little cause for celebration during the upcoming Muslim holiday of Qurban Bayram, also known as Eid al-Adha.

In Qatar, more than 900 mosques and prayer grounds across Qatar will host Eid al-Adha prayers, the Ministry of Endowments and Islamic Affairs (Awqaf) announced.

Awqaf published the list of the mosques and prayer grounds on its social media accounts.  Name, number and location of the 924 mosques and prayer grounds are available on the Twitter handle of the ministry, wrote gulf-times.com.

 

   
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