News ID: 318168
Published: 0253 GMT November 23, 2021

Sudanese ministers resign in protest at deal with military

Sudanese ministers resign in protest at deal with military
SUDANESE PRESIDENTIAL PALACE

Sudan’s Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok

Twelve cabinet ministers have submitted their resignation to newly reinstated Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok in protest at a political deal between the prime minister and the country’s ruling military council.

On Sunday, Hamdok was reinstated after signing a political agreement with the head of the military council, General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, to end a weeks-long crisis that threatened to undermine the country’s political transition.

While the deal was largely welcomed by the international community, Sudanese pro-democracy activists have rejected it as an “attempt to legitimise the coup”. They demand that the military should not be part of any future Sudan government, Al Jazeera reported.

The resigned ministers were part of a transitional government led by Hamdok that was dissolved on October 25 by Burhan. The military’s move sparked nationwide protests during which at least 41 people were killed in a security crackdown.

The resigned ministers include the ministers of foreign affairs, justice, agriculture, irrigation, investment and energy, according to a statement issued by the ministers. The ministers of higher education, labour, transport, health, youth and religious affairs also tendered their resignation.

The statement said the five ministers were members of the Forces of Freedom and Change (FFC) coalition, which had shared power with the military before last month’s military takeover, were unable to attend Monday’s cabinet meeting.

Burhan declared a state of emergency and dismissed the transitional government on October 25, amid rival protests and accusations between the military and politicians.

The transitional government comprising of civilians and military figures was formed after a power-sharing deal agreed after the popular overthrow of longtime ruler Omar al-Bashir in 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
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