News ID: 319363
Published: 0315 GMT January 12, 2022

Saudi reports highest daily new COVID-19 infections so far

Saudi reports highest daily new COVID-19 infections so far
FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP

Saudi staff check people’s mobiles for vaccine certificates or a negative COVID-19 test in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Saudi Arabia registered its highest daily number of new COVID-19 infections so far, Health Ministry data showed, breaking through 5,000 cases on Wednesday.

Cases in the kingdom, which has the largest population among the Persian Gulf Arab States – around 35 million – have risen dramatically since the start of the year with the global spread of the Omicron variant, according to Reuters.

The kingdom on Wednesday reported 5,362 new cases and two deaths, rising above the previous peak of daily infections in June 2020 of 4,919.

Mask wearing in public in Saudi Arabia has been compulsory since the start of the year.

Other Persian Gulf Arab states have also seen infections surge in the past month, with Kuwait and Qatar also breaking through previous daily case records.

Meanwhile, Germany reported more than 80,000 new coronavirus infections, the highest recorded in a single day since the pandemic began, as daily coronavirus infections in Bulgaria reached a record high of 7,062.

The European Medicines Agency says the spread of the Omicron coronavirus variant across the continent is pushing COVID-19 towards being an endemic disease that humanity can live with.

The number of new coronavirus infections in the last week jumped by about 55%, although the number of deaths remained stable, the World Health Organization said in its latest pandemic report, according to AP.

In the weekly report issued Tuesday night, the UN health agency said there were about 15 million new COVID-19 cases last week and more than 43,000 deaths. Every world region reported a rise in COVID-19 cases except for Africa, where officials saw an 11% drop.

Last week, WHO noted a pandemic record high of 9.5 million new infections in a single week, calling it a “tsunami” of disease.

 

 

 

 

   
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