News ID: 322548
Published: 0323 GMT June 25, 2022

Fresh transport strikes hit UK, mainland Europe

Fresh transport strikes hit UK, mainland Europe
AFP

Britain's railway system once again came to a virtual standstill on Saturday and flights in Europe were disrupted as strikes in the travel sector hit the continent.

Tens of thousands of rail workers in the UK staged the latest day-long walkout over pay and job security, hampering weekend plans for those already hit by similar strikes on Tuesday and Thursday, AFP reported.

The Rail, Maritime and Transport union (RMT) insists this week's actions were necessary as wages have failed to keep pace with UK inflation, which has hit a 40-year high and is on course to keep rising.

It also wants a threat of compulsory redundancies withdrawn.

RMT secretary general Mick Lynch said its members are "standing up for all working people trying to get a pay rise and some job security".

"In a modern economy, workers need to be properly rewarded for their work, enjoy good conditions and have the peace of mind that their job will not be taken away from them," he added.

 

Global unions call for swift end to strike

 

On the eve of the latest walkout, Friday, international transport trade unions urged London to negotiate a swift end to the rail strike.

More than 100 unions have written an open letter to UK Transport Secretary Grant Shapps calling on him to help settle the bitter row over pay, as surging inflation sparks growing industrial unrest.

The letter was signed by unions from across the world, including Asia, Europe, South America and the Middle East.

Britain, like much of Europe, is suffering from rocketing inflation and stagnant economic growth, raising the prospect of a summer of strikes across the continent.

Staff from budget Irish airline Ryanair staged strikes in Spain, Italy, France, Portugal and Belgium on Saturday, forcing the cancellation of two flights between Lisbon and Brussels.

Ryanair staff staged their second day of action in Spain, resulting in delays to flights but so far no cancellations.

The aviation sector is struggling to recover from the pandemic, which led to mass layoffs as international travel was put on hold.

Faced with staff shortages, Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport was forced to announce earlier this month that it would be limiting traveler numbers this summer and cancelling flights.

The shortages have already caused hundreds of flights to be cancelled, while huge queues have angered travelers.

 

   
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